Best Corded Electric Weed Eaters 2019 – Reviews & Buying Guide

a corded-electric weedwackerElectric power tools are better for the environment than their gas counterparts, and in many cases, they’re quieter and lighter as well, which means they’re better for you, too. If you’re ready to take the plunge and invest in a tool that’s easy to use and easy on the environment, too, then be sure to check out these reviews of the best corded electric weed eaters of 2019.

However, it’s not always easy to shop for tools online. It’s not clear which parts of a product description are real, useful information and which are just marketing fluff. But, our reviews are designed to cut through the uncertainty and help you find the model that’s right for you. We’ve also included a buyer’s guide so that you can learn everything you need to know about corded electric weed eaters before you buy.

Our Top 4 Picks of 2019

ModelPriceWeightEditor Rating
Black & Decker GH900
BLACK+DECKER GH900
(Top Pick)

Check Price
7 lbs4.85/5
Greenworks 21212
Greenworks 21212

Check Price
7 lbs4.6/5
Toro 51480
Toro 51480

Check Price
6 lbs4.5/5
Worx WG119
Worx WG119

Check Price
7 lbs4.2/5

4 Best Corded Electric Weed Eaters – Reviews:

1. Black & Decker GH900 – Top Pick

Black & Decker GH900

The Black and Decker GH900 is a great pick for someone who wants an easy to use corded electric weed eater. It comes with an automatic feed, so you don’t ever have to worry about advancing the line manually. You’ll love the 13” cutting swath, which allows you to clear large areas in small amounts of time. It also comes with easy to change string, so when it’s time to load more string, you won’t have to spend a lot of time messing around and can get back to work as soon as possible.

You can also adjust the length of the shaft, which means that this is a good model if you’re on the shorter or taller side, or if you’re going to be sharing this tool with people who greatly vary from you in height. The only real downside to this model is that the automatic feed is sometimes inefficient, spitting out more trimmer line than it ought to. There are some workarounds for this, but it would be nice if this part was better tuned out of the box. Overall, this is the best choice for anyone who wants an easy to use corded electric weed eater.

Pros
  • Automatic feed
  • 13” cutting swath
  • Easy to change string
  • Adjustable length shaft
Cons
  • Automatic feed sometimes inefficient

2. Greenworks 21212 – The Runner-Up

Greenworks 21212

The Greenworks 21212 is a good choice for anyone looking for a slightly cheaper model than the previous model on our list but has overall similar features. It too comes with a 13” cutting swath, which is large enough to clear most yards in a reasonable amount of time. If you’re tall or short, you’ll be able to make good use of the adjustable length shaft in order to find the exact length that keeps you from hunching over or feeling like you’re not tall enough. It also comes with good power, not just clearing small weeds, but doing a good job in overgrown areas, which makes this weed eater a good investment is your yard is starting to get out of control.

It also comes with a four-year warranty, which is longer than most tools on the market today. However, this model has an inconsistent spool. Some people have problems with it using up too much trimmer line, while others complain that they can’t get it to dispense at all. A problem like that is very serious, and while this is a great weed eater overall, that problem drops it out of first place.

Pros
  • 13” cutting swath
  • Adjustable length shaft
  • Great warranty
  • Good power
Cons
  • Inconsistent spool

3. Toro 51480

Toro 51480

The Toro 51480 is a decent midrange corded electric weed eater, but it does have some serious problems that prevent it from rising higher on our list. It comes with a 14” cutting swath, which is the above average, which means that you’re going to be trimming large areas, this model is worth a look. It’s also a dual edger and weed eater, and you can switch between the two modes by rotating the head at the end of the shaft. It also comes with a wheel for edging mode that makes it easy to cut a clean line down a sidewalk.

It too comes with an adjustable shaft, which is good for households were people of different heights will be using the weed eater and makes it so each person can use it at a comfortable height. However, it has an inefficient automatic feed that tends to waste too much line, which adds to its cost of operation. It also suffers from quality control issues that sometimes cause it to break after just a few uses. While it does have some upside, there are other models of higher quality that you can get for a similar price.

Pros
  • 14” cutting swath
  • Dual edger/weed eater
  • Adjustable shaft
Cons
  • Inefficient automatic feed
  • Quality control issues

4. Worx WG119

Worx WG119

The Worx WG119 includes one feature that can’t be found on any other model. It includes a four-position head adjustment mechanism which allows you to adjust the angle so that you don’t have to struggle as much on slopes. If you know that you’re going to be using your weed eater in angled areas, this feature can make those jobs much easier. It also comes with a 15” cutting swatch, which is the largest on our list and means you’ll get big jobs done faster.

It also comes with an adjustable shaft, which just adds to the function of this weed eater on slopes, as you can adjust the shaft to a length that’s more comfortable for working upwards or downwards. However, this model comes with severe quality control problems that means it often breaks within a few months. This could be related to some design issues, including an air intake that’s close enough to the ground that it’s sure to suck in the dust you kick up while you work. Overall, this weed eater has some interesting features, but the quality control problems and the design issues are significant enough to make this a frustrating buy.

Pros
  • 15” cutting swath
  • Adjustable shaft
  • Head adjustment for slopes
Cons
  • Quality control problems
  • Design issues

Buyer’s Guide

We hope that our reviews have already taught you some things about corded electric weed eaters. If you want to learn more about these tools, be sure to check out this buyer’s guide. It’s full of good information for beginners but can also be sued as a refresher course by those who haven’t bought one of these tools in a long time. After reading this guide, you should be able to find the model of corded electric weed eater that is right for you.

Ease of use

Ease of use is arguably the most important feature of a corded electric weed eater. No one likes a tool that you’re going to have to fuss with a lot to get it to do what you want. The very best tools work right out of the box without much work on your part and work well even if it’s your first time using them.

Electric corded weed eaters tend to be on the easier side of the spectrum, but that doesn’t mean that some models aren’t better in this area than others. For example, a big difference from model-to-model is how easy it is to change out the trimmer line when necessary. While many products boast of excellence in this area, reading online reviews often reveals a different story.

You also have to keep in mind that you’ll have to use an extension cord with these string trimmers. The lower the amperage of the weed eater, the lower the quality of your extension cable can be, yet still provide enough power to your weed eater to keep it running. If you’re going to be working far from electric outlets, you want to consider purchasing a battery-powered weed eater, or even a gas-powered model.

Bump feed vs auto advance

Most weed eaters in the past have relied on a bump feed to advance the trimmer line when necessary. That means that when you realize the string is too short, you would bump the head against the ground, and that action would expel more string. The benefit of this is that you have to be constantly watching your string length and that on cheaper models you’ll have to bump a few times before string is dispensed.

Most modern corded electric weed eaters use auto advance. While there are exceptions to this rule, the majority of auto advance string trimmers expel trimmer line when the user releases the throttle. That works well in situations where you’re clearing brush or thick grass and will be holding the throttle down for a long time. However, if you’re clearing out a bunch of small sections and releasing the throttle in-between, you may find that the auto advance is spitting out far more line than is necessary, which can be a pain to deal with.

Weight

The nice thing about corded electric weed eaters is that they don’t have a heavy gas engine or heavy batteries onboard. That means you can get a model that weighs less than ten pounds, which is a good deal for people with bad backs or who lack a lot of upper body strength. Even if you’re quite buff, using a lightweight weed eater means you’ll be less worn out at the end of the day.

The best models weigh about seven pounds, which is very light when it comes to power tools. If you see a corded model that has a listed weight greater than ten pounds, you should start asking questions. It’s possible that you’re looking at an older model that doesn’t take advantage of recent advances in technology. One thing to note is that the weight in a corded electric weed eater is clustered near the head of the machine, but the shaft serves as a long lever, and it’s ultimately not that hard to lift.

Dual-edger/weed eaters

Some electric models imitate more expensive gas-powered models and include the ability to be used as either a weed eater or as an edger. Most electric models that have this feature work by including a mechanism where the shaft meets the electric motor, which allows it to be rotated 90-degrees. That way, it can be used in either configuration. The best models use a wheel, which allows you to set the machine on the ground when in edger mode and roll it along, which lowers the weight you feel even more, but also helps you travel in a straight line.

Some models don’t work well in one mode or the other, so be sure to watch out for warnings about that in the reviews. You also may want to avoid models that don’t have a twist-joint near the bottom but instead require you to turn the whole machine and hold it differently. That makes for an awkward and imprecise edging job, and it won’t look as good as it would with a different model.

Which corded electric weed eater is right for you?

While we do have a top choice on our list, it’s not going to be the right model for all people. Everyone approaches this problem with a different set of needs and a different budget. If you want to get the best value out of your purchase, you need to figure out what your needs are, and how you can best meet those needs with the budget you have.

A good way to go about that is to start by compiling a list of features that you want your next corded electric weed eater to have. Once you’ve created that list, eliminate all models that don’t have those features. The remaining models will all be good value because you’ll get all the functionality that you need. You can get even more value by buying the least expensive model on the list to save some money, or by purchasing the one with the best features, if the price is still within your budget.

Conclusion

The Black and Decker GH900 is a great choice for people looking for a reliable corded electric weed eater with an automatic feed, easy to change string, and an adjustable shaft. The Greenworks 21212 is slightly cheaper than our top model and comes with many of the same features, but an inconsistent spool keeps it out of first place. The Toro 51480 has a larger than average cutting swath and converts between weed eating and edging modes, but an inefficient automatic feed and other quality control issues keep it out of the top two. The Worx WG119 has the largest cutting swath on our list and comes with an adjustable head for slopes, which is a cool feature, but quality control problems and design issues sink it to the bottom of our list.

We hope that our reviews and our buyer’s guide have helped you find not only the model that’s perfect for you but one that’s perfect for your wallet, too.

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