Best DeWalt Table Saw Reviews 2019 – Top Picks

a Dewalt table sawing machineYour Amish neighbors think they’re so impressive, with their beards, and their shirt hooks, and their aversion to power tools. Now you’ve got a chance to show those jerks up while both of you add on to outbuildings. But your advantage—the willingness to use powered technology—will get prove your downfall if you can’t use it on site. So, you’ve hit the Internet to check out Dewalt table saw reviews to see which one will help you crush your buggy-driving neighbors.

We like the cut of your jib, so we’re going to help you out. We’ve tested some of DeWalt’s table saws just for people like you who want to show up their neighbors. If you think we didn’t quite nail the right saw for you, we’ve also included a handy buyer’s guide so that you can make the smartest choice possible.

Comparison of our 3 Favorite Picks

ModelPriceWeightEditor Rating
DEWALT DWE7491RS
DEWALT DWE7491RS
(Top Pick)

Check Price
110 lbs5.0/5
DEWALT DW745
DEWALT DW745
(Best for the Money)

Check Price
53 lbs4.8/5
DEWALT DCS7485B
DEWALT DCS7485B

Check Price
45 lbs4.5/5

3 Best DeWalt Table Saw Reviews 2019:

1. DEWALT Table Saw DWE7491RS – Top Pick

DEWALT DWE7491RS

The DWE7491RS gets our nod for the top pick for a very simple reason—it just goes to town on wood. It will cut anything you throw at it, and only slows down a little for the really hard stuff. It delivers power, accuracy, and attitude. It’s also within the average person’s price range.

Compactible, the saw can easily fit into a tight workshop space. This means it won’t eat up valuable real estate. This also means that it’s easier to transport than a tool that breaks down into something bigger and bulkier.

Now for the negative. The miter gauge is straight-up garbage. It’s flimsy, poorly-marked, and not very accurate. Plus, it has a habit of popping out at very inconvenient times. When you buy this saw, you’ll want to buy a compatible new miter gauge from a different manufacturer.

Pros
  • Powerful
  • Murders wood
  • Built for small footprint storage
  • Designed for larger cut pieces
Cons
  • Miter gauge is garbage

2. DEWALT Table Saw (DW745) – Best for the Money

DEWALT DW745

Our best value for your dollar choice is a perfect harmony of power and portability. In fact, it’s similar to DeWalt’s follow-up model, the DWE7491RS, in every way except for rip capacity. The DW745 has a smaller one which knocked it out of the top spot. All things being equal, just go with the larger rip capacity for greater flexibility of use.

But, that’s also a pretty minor thing in the larger scheme of things. And so the difference in price between these models is enough to make the DW745 our “best for the money” choice. You can pick this up and get a legitimately good, portable, powerful job site saw and only trade a little in rip capacity. How much? This one has 20 inches, compared to 32.5 inches for the DWE7491RS.

The DW745 also shares its larger cousin’s failings with its miter gauge. It’s a wonder, given the long-standing nature of this complaint, that DeWalt hasn’t managed to fix it. But they haven’t, and if you buy this one, we advise you to save yourself annoyance by ordering a new miter gauge when you do.

Pros
  • Lovely marriage of power and portability
Cons
  • Miter gauge is garbage
  • Smaller rip capacity than the top choice

3. DEWALT Table Saw (DCS7485B)

DEWALT DCS7485B

We respect the thinking that went into creating the DCS7485B. Lightweight, portable, battery-operated—there’s vision behind it. We like where DeWalt is going with it, and can’t wait until they get there. The day when you don’t have to risk a hernia to move a table saw will be a day of victory for the common man.

But it’s a journey that’s still in progress. The DCS7485B is lightweight and portable, and it’s also very quiet. What it can’t do is hard work for an extended period of time. The battery just isn’t there and the trade-off for 60 volts of power limits the range of what you can legitimately expect to cut through. It’s possible to upgrade the battery, but our reviews are based on what comes inside the box. And what comes inside the box with this one has a good deal of promise for only a little bit of delivery.

Pros
  • Portable
  • Quiet
Cons
  • Battery drains quickly
  • Underpowered

Buyer’s Guide

We totally get that this review is narrowly tailored to DeWalt saws and that, despite that brand’s sterling reputation for quality, you might want to do some shopping around. So, we decided to share some tips on how we went about the job of reviewing saws to arrive at our conclusions.

The saw you need

The first step always has to be to make sure that you match a saw with your actual needs. It’s a pretty simple thing to go out and buy the biggest, angriest saw available and call it good. But your genuine needs might be modest enough that the biggest, angriest saw is also too much saw, which means that you’re just throwing away a bunch of money. The same goes with weight. If you’re a small-framed person who has difficulty lugging around heavy, bulky objects, you’ll want to tailor your saw to your frame. If you can’t use it, it’s the same thing as not owning it.

The same goes for the kind of work you expect to do. Although a table saw is a pretty serious investment, you can trim money off your purchase if you don’t need something that will go through ash like a katana through a zombie. If you need the power or anticipate needing it in the future, you’ll want to invest extra to get it. So, be honest about what you’re going to need and tailor your major purchase to meet those needs.

Portability

Because table saws are usually job site saws, you’ll want to take a look at specs related to how easily it moves around. Consider how much it weighs—not just the saw itself, but all the extras that you’ll need to do your work. Again, if you’re small framed, you’ll want to make sure that the saw you purchase is suited to your build. If you’re big and burly, you can get away with a larger, more powerful saw.

But here we can start to dream. DeWalt’s DCS7485B is a saw you can use basically anywhere. It’s cordless, so you don’t have to worry about outlets and extension cords (except to charge batteries). Because of that, it’s also more compact and lighter than most models that have a power cord. The trade-off is that the battery life is limited, especially compared to wall power. Even with DeWalt’s features to increase its cordless power, it’s still not quite there yet compared to corded drills. But again, for the work you require of it, this might be a perfect fit.

Rip capacity

Rip capacity is a jargony-sounding term which refers to the size of the piece you can cut. Bigger saws tend to—ta-da—have the ability to cut larger pieces of wood. This can be important because woodworking often involves using large pieces of wood used either in remodeling homes or building new additions. If you need the flexibility of handling large pieces of wood, you’ll want to give serious consideration to the rip capacity of the saws you’re looking at because it’ll come into play at some point.

Price

You can’t comparison shop for anything without looking at price at some point. Here’s where you can really apply some hard-nosed thinking. How much are you willing to pay for this feature, or that much rip capacity, or that much power? You might think that your budget requires that you buy the absolute rock-bottom least expensive saw on the market, but when you start comparing prices you might find that it doesn’t cost all that much to get a little more power or more peace of mind through a slightly better warranty. And, of course, prices change all the time. So if you don’t find what you want at the price you want today, it might be there tomorrow. Or, you can also look to refurbished models or other deals.

Conclusion

Our review of DeWalt table saws focused on two models that are very, very similar and one that harkens great advancements in the tool line that sadly has yet to fully come to fruition. The DWE7491RS and DW745 are very similar. The 7491 is slightly more powerful but also slightly heavier and both have miter gauges that should be replaced when purchasing the saws themselves. But the differences are slight enough that our choice of top pick comes down to the 7491’s larger rip capacity. That’s something that won’t affect a lot of people very often, so if your dollars are tight, you can go with a better for-dollar value with the DW745.

We fell in love with the idea of the DCS7485B. It’s battery powered, lightweight, quiet, and super portable. That means taking it to a job site won’t in itself be a workout. But the battery just doesn’t deliver quite yet, so while we’re keeping our eyes open for new innovations in the technology, right this minute we suggest that if you have any serious work to do that you look to a more robust model.

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