Best Laminate Floor Cutters 2019 – Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

a laminate flooring cutting-toolInstalling laminate flooring can be a great way to make your home look great, and doing your own installation is a great way to save money and develop your skills. You need a laminate floor cutter in order to install this flooring, but if you’re trying to shop online, you may have realized that it’s hard to tell which model is right for you.

If you’re unfamiliar with these tools, it may be hard to tell which parts of a product description are advertising fluff, and which contain useful information. We don’t want you to have this problem, so we’ve created these reviews of the best laminate floor cutters of 2019, so you can find the model that’s right for you. We’ve also created a buyer’s guide so that you can learn everything you need to know about laminate floor cutters before you buy.

Comparison of our Favorite Picks

ModelPriceWeightEditor Rating
Roberts 10-64 Multi-Floor Cutter
Roberts 10-64 Multi-Floor Cutter
(Top Pick)

Check Price
24 lbs4.9/5
Bullet Tools ES00-0009
Bullet Tools ES00-0009

Check Price
17 lbs4.6/5
SKIL 3601-02 Flooring Saw
SKIL 3601-02 Flooring Saw
(Best for the Money)

Check Price
24 lbs4.5/5
EAB Tool Exchange-a-Blade 2100005
EAB Tool Exchange-a-Blade 2100005

Check Price
12 lbs4.25/5
D-CUT PL-215
D-CUT PL-215

Check Price
12 lbs4.0/5

5 Best Laminate Floor Cutters 2019 – Reviews

1. Roberts 10-64 Laminate Floor Cutter – Top Pick

Roberts 10-64 Multi-Floor Cutter

The Roberts 10-64 Multi-Floor Cutter is our top choice, and a great pick for anyone who is going to be putting down a lot of flooring of different types. If you’re remodeling your home, or work as a contractor remodeling others’ homes, you’ll love that this machine can cut vinyl flooring and siding, VCT tiles, laminate, engineered wood, and rubber or foam tiles. It comes with a 13-inch capacity, which is more than enough to cut most kinds of flooring, and it can cut flooring up to 5/8-inch thick.

It uses a long handle, which gives you a lot of leverage and makes cutting even tough materials easy. And, if you work with a lot of tough materials, you’ll that the blade is removable, so that you can resharpen it when needed, or replace it. The one problem with this model is that it sometimes chips the edges when it cuts, but since most ends of what you but will go under molding anyway, that’s not going to be a big problem for most people. If you’re looking for a great laminate cutter for home or commercial use, this is the model for you.

Pros
  • 13” capacity
  • Cuts many flooring materials
  • Long handle
  • Blade can be resharpened
Cons
  • Some chipping

2. Bullet Tools ES00-0009 Laminate Flooring Cutter – The Runner-Up

Bullet Tools ES00-0009

The Bullet Tools ES00-0009 is a good choice for people who don’t want to shell out the money for our top model but want to get similar functionality. This model has a 9” capacity in width and can cut flooring that is up to 9/16-inch thick. It also comes with a built-in ruler, which is a nice addition that allows you to measure your flooring right on the cutter. That will save you a bit of time each cut, which could add up to a lot of time saved if you’re working on a bit project.

It comes pre-assembled, which means you don’t have to spend time messing with it and can instead get right to work. It can also cut the same materials as the first model but adds luxury vinyl plank, fiber cement and pressboard lap siding, and tar or wood shingles. The reason this model falls out of first is that it has more cutting problems than our top model. It has a habit of cutting jaggedly, or not at a perfect 90-degree angle, which can lead to fit problems. This does vary from unit to unit, so this is still a good investment for most people.

Pros
  • 9” capacity
  • Built-in ruler
  • No assembly required
  • Cuts many flooring materials
Cons
  • Inconsistent cuts

3. SKIL 3601-02 Laminate Flooring Saw – Best for the Money

SKIL 3601-02 Flooring Saw

The SKIL 3601-02 Flooring Saw is our choice for best for the money. It’s an electric flooring saw instead of a manual cutter, which means you don’t rely on your physical strength to make the cut. It’s a very versatile saw, and it allows you to make cross, miter, and rip cuts, which means you can always get the cut you’re looking for when doing flooring, even if the piece needs to be shaped strangely to fit. It comes with an aluminum miter and rip fence which holds up well to use and should last you a long time.

Amazingly enough, you can get this electric flooring saw for less than the first two models on our list. That’s a crazy good deal right here, especially because this might be the better saw. Note that it is a power tool, and that means you need more training to use it safely, but you can get more kinds of cuts. What keeps it out of the top two is how loud and dusty it is. If you’re working on your own home, know that it will disturb other occupants and you’ll have to clean up a lot after using it.

Pros
  • Cross, miter, and rip cuts
  • Aluminum miter and rip fence
  • Electric
  • Price
Cons
  • Loud
  • Dusty

4. EAB Tool Exchange-a-Blade 2100005 Laminate Flooring Cutter-Tool

EAB Tool Exchange-a-Blade 2100005

At first glance, the EAB Tool Exchange-a-Blade 2100005 might remind you of the Bullet Tools ES00-0009. It features the same manual operation and 9-inch capacity. However, this model has some differing design choices that make it less valuable. One thing it does have going in its favor is that it comes with an angle gauge, which makes it one of the few manual floor cutters that allow you to cut angles into your flooring.

However, this model lacks a full stabilization plate, which means you’re not going to be able to hold your flooring as stable while you cut, especially if cutting an angle. It also has quality control problems, which means you can’t expect it to last as long as other models. You also can’t expect perfect cuts on every material, as this model is prone to the same chipping problems that you’ll find on most manual floor cutters. While these are significant reasons, this model’s price is very low, so you do end up with decent value for the price. If you’re not doing a large project and need something cheap to get you through it, this model is worth your consideration.

Pros
  • Price
  • Angle gauge
Cons
  • Doesn’t have full stabilization plate
  • Quality control problems

5. D-CUT PL-215 Floor Cutter suited for Laminate Material

D-CUT PL-215

The D-CUT PL-215 features a very different design than the other models on our list. It features an exposed blade with a long handle that you use to cut your flooring like you were using a long kitchen knife. You can cut flooring at any angle with this floor cutter, which is nice. The blade is also advertised as a flat, dull blade, which should never wear out, no matter how much use you put on it. That claim is difficult to evaluate, but it does mean the machine relies on force more than sharpness.

However, you probably won’t end up using this model that much. It requires a ton of force to use relative to other models on our list, which means you won’t like using it nearly as much. It’s also difficult to stabilize your flooring while you cut, due to the lack of a large stabilization plate. It also has quality control problems, which means the extreme force you use to get the model working may break it instead. This is likely to be a frustrating model for most people, so if you want to get a model that you’ll like using, you should consider other models.

Pros
  • Multiple angle options
  • Blade won’t wear out
Cons
  • Quality control problems
  • Requires a lot of force to use
  • Difficult to stabilize flooring

Buyer’s Guide

We hope that our reviews have already created a front-runner in your quest to find the model that’s right for you. If you’re still not sure which model that is, be sure to check out this buyer’s guide. We’ve packed it full of good general information about laminate floor cutters, which should allow you to learn everything you need to know before you buy, even if you’ve never installed your own flooring before.

Electric vs manual

While most models on our list are manual models, we did include a single electric model. There are reasons to pick both, so you need to understand the differences between them before you buy.

Manual floor cutters typically use a blade and a long handle to cut flooring. They rely on your physical strength to work, so they’ll wear you out if you cut a lot of flooring. They also tend to chip your flooring near the cutting edge, so you have to be careful when using them. However, they’re very quiet relative to electric models and don’t produce nearly as much dust, so they’re better for use indoors.

Electric floor cutters are messy, producing a ton of dust with their sawblades, and they are also usually very noisy. However, they cut very quickly and generally come with more options when it comes to mitering your flooring. They also don’t rely on your physical strength, so they won’t wear you out nearly as quickly as a manual model.

Ease of use

Of course, some models are easier to use than others. Electric models are generally easier to use than manual models, in terms of physical strength alone, while it’s easy to learn how to use a manual model. Electric models require more cleanup since they produce far more dust, which makes them slightly more inconvenient to use.

However, there are differences among manual models. The width of the blade from model to model varies, which change the width of the board that you can cut, and you’ll want to make sure that you get one that can support the flooring you’re planning to work with and might work with in the future. If your flooring too narrow, you’re going to need a new model.

You should also keep an eye out for models that allow their blades to be removed and sharpened or replaced. That means you can spend some money or sharpen the blade yourself, and won’t have to buy a new unit, which saves you a lot of money in the long run.

Supported flooring materials

The flooring materials supported by each model varies widely. One of the first things to consider is the distance between the blade and the stabilization plate, as that’s the maximum height of flooring that you can use. More expensive flooring types tend to be thicker, so you’ll want to keep that in mind while you browse.

Some models don’t have the force to punch through denser materials, so you should always make sure your chosen flooring is among the listed supported floorings before you buy. If you’re a contractor, you’d be wise to buy a floor cutter that supports a large variety of flooring materials, as you don’t know which kind you’ll be using next.

Keep in mind that it’s not necessarily the blade that makes it easy to hard to punch through tougher materials. The longer the handle, the easier it is, but the way that the handle delivers the force to the blade matters, too. Knife-style flooring cutters aren’t as efficient as guillotine-style cutters.

Which laminate floor cutter is right for you?

While we do have a model in first place on our list, we know that model might not be the right one for every person. Everyone has different needs and a different budget, which means different models will serve different people better.

If you’re looking to get the model that’s right for you, start by figuring out which flooring you’re going to be working with. Once you’ve done that, create a short list of models that can cut that flooring, and then decide if you want electric or manual operation, and eliminate the other from your list. Once you’ve done that, the remaining models will have all the features you need, and you’re safe to buy the cheapest remaining model, which will provide the best value.

Conclusion

The Roberts 10-64 Multi-Floor Cutter is our favorite model due to its large capacity, a blade that you can resharpen, and its wide range of supported flooring materials. The Bullet Tools ES00-0009 costs less than the first model and cuts more kinds of flooring, but has inconsistent cuts, so it drops to second on our list. The SKIL 3601-02 Flooring Saw is the best value for the money on our list. It’s an electric saw that quickly cuts through materials, and can do miter cuts as well, though the dust and noise it produces keep it out of the top two. The EAB Tool Exchange-a-Blade 2100005 comes with an angle gauge and a good price, but the lack of a full stabilization plate and quality control problems drop it to four on our list. The D-CUT PL-215 features the most angle options of any floor cutter on our list, but it requires a lot of force to use and has serious quality control problems.

We hope that our reviews and our buyer’s guide have led you to a model that you’ll love using and that your wallet will love, too.