Best Shingle Removal Tools 2019 – Top Picks & Reviews

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a shingle removal tool

Every homeowner will eventually need their roof re-shingled. It may be easier to have professionals do it, but it can also be costly. There are many different tools that are made specifically for removing shingles. We reviewed several of them and want to share our favorite five with you.

HealthyHandyman’s Favorites

ModelPriceWeightEditor Rating
Malco SB48AE The Beast Roof Shingle Removal Tool
Malco SB48AE The Beast Roof Shingle Removal Tool(Top Pick)

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9 lbs4.65/5
Bully Tools 91110 10-Gauge ProShingle
Bully Tools 91110 10-Gauge ProShingle(Best for the Money)

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5 lbs4.50/5
Qualcraft 54-Inch Shingle Removal Shovel
Qualcraft 54-Inch Shingle Removal Shovel

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7 lbs4.30/5
Dasco Pro 640 Shingle Ripper Pry Bar
Dasco Pro 640 Shingle Ripper Pry Bar

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2 lbs4.25/5
Shingle Eater Junior
Shingle Eater Junior

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3 lbs3.95/5

5 Best Shingle Removers – Reviews 2019

1. Malco SB48AE The Beast Roof Shingle Removal Tool – Top Pick

Malco SB48AE The Beast Roof Shingle Removal Tool

The Malco SB48AE The Beast Roof Shingle Removal Tool has a 48-inch heavy-duty, yet lightweight, fiberglass handle. A D-grip at the end gives you the firm, comfortable grip you need for a long day of hard work.

The head of the shovel is adjustable so you can use it on the slope of any roof. It also has replaceable ten-gauge tempered steel blades to slide under your old roofing material to pry it up.

When we were using this shingle removal tool, we found that although it’s made well, it’s challenging to get entirely underneath your shingles. It either doesn’t want to slide, or it rams into the top of the shingle in the next layer down. It’s also pretty heavy, especially since most of it is fiberglass. Our arms got fatigued faster than they would’ve with lighter models.

Pros
  • 48-inch heavy-duty fiberglass handle
  • Replaceable ten-gauge tempered steel blades
  • Adjustable head
  • Comfortable D-grip handle
Cons
  • Heavy
  • Challenging to get blade entirely under shingles

2. Bully Tools 91110 10-Gauge ProShingle – Best for the Money

Bully Tools 91110 10-Gauge ProShingle

The Bully Tools 91110 10-Gauge ProShingle has a commercial grade fiberglass handle that’s light enough to handle with ease. The handle is only about three-and-a-half-feet long, though, so it’s pretty short for taller people. Having to lean lower to use it is taxing on the back. There is, however, a sturdy polypropylene D-grip at the end that fits your hand comfortably and allows you to work longer with no hand pain.

The shovel is made of extra-thick ten-gauge steel. The heavy construction allows you to lift more significant amounts of debris at a time. We found that the points of the teeth were too sharp, though, and dug into the plywood base. After we sanded them down some, the shovel slid effortlessly under the felt paper and did a fantastic job at removing both the shingles and the nails.

Pros
  • Commercial grade fiberglass handle
  • Polypropylene D-grip
  • Extra-thick ten-gauge steel shovel
Cons
  • Too short
  • Points are too sharp

3. Qualcraft 54-Inch Shingle Removal Shovel

Qualcraft 54-Inch Shingle Removal Shovel

The Qualcraft 54-Inch Shingle Removal Shovel is entirely constructed with durable steel. The handle does have an ergonomic shape, but the angle at which it sits isn’t the best. Since steel weighs more than other materials, this tool’s extra weight and the poor angle can wear your back out quickly.

The working edge has been heat-tempered to give it extra strength, and it has a nail puller for stubborn nails that don’t come up with the shingles. We found that the teeth are almost too thick. It was challenging to get them to slide underneath the nails.

Even though this tool is all steel, it’s a lower-grade steel to make it as light as possible. Since it isn’t heavy-duty steel, it’s excellent for occasional home use, but not for professionals who use one daily.

Pros
  • Durable all-steel construction
  • Ergonomic handle
  • Heat-tempered work edge
  • Nail puller
Cons
  • Not meant for daily use
  • Heavy
  • Challenging to get under nails

4. Dasco Pro 640 Shingle Ripper Pry Bar

Dasco Pro 640 Shingle Ripper Pry Bar

The Dasco Pro 640 Shingle Ripper Pry Bar has a handle, and head, made of high-carbon American steel. This steel is lightweight, but it’s heat-treated to give it added strength. The pry bar also has a 24-inch steel head to loosen and remove your shingles.

We tried this tool on many types of roofing materials and found it doesn’t work well on cedar shakes. The tip is too thick to get up under the nails on smaller shakes, and too wide to fit between them.

When working with shingles, we found the tip too thick to get under tightly nailed shingles, and it doesn’t have teeth to pull many of the nails themselves. You’ll have to backtrack to remove the nails with a different tool.

We had one job that only required replacing a couple of shingles, so we wanted to remove them one at a time. This tool doesn’t work well that way. It’s meant to rip apart many tiles at a time.

Pros
  • High-carbon, heat-treated American steel construction
  • 24-inch steel head
Cons
  • Doesn’t remove many nails
  • Doesn’t work well on cedar shakes
  • Too thick to slide under tightly nailed shingles
  • Not for replacing one or two shingles

5. Shingle Eater Junior

Shingle Eater Junior

The Shingle Eater Junior has an ergonomically designed handle for a comfortable grip, so your arms and shoulders don’t get too tired or painful. The base plate has stiffening corrugations to make it stronger to rip up several shingles at a time.

This tool is challenging to slide entirely under shingles to remove them, especially if there’s heavy tar. The steel isn’t strong enough to handle that.

Pros
  • Ergonomic handle
  • Steel base plate with stiffening corrugations
Cons
  • Doesn’t work well with heavy tar
  • Challenging to slide very far under shingles

Buyer’s Guide

What to look for

1. Weight

Roofing is strenuous enough without adding the weight of a heavy tool. Look for a shovel that’s made of quality material that doesn’t weigh too much. Extra weight causes you to get fatigued faster, as well as having more pain in your whole body, especially the arms and shoulders.

2. Design

Roofing is tiring for anyone, but even more so if you don’t have tools designed for you. Be sure that the shovel’s length is appropriate for your height.

The handle should be ergonomically shaped and covered in a comfortable non-slip material that will reduce the fatigue in your hands, and keep blisters at bay.

The shovel should be large enough to lift large sections of debris.

3. Durability

Roofing is hard work, and you don’t want your tools breaking in the middle of the job. Get a device made of durable material, such as fiberglass or tempered steel. Good quality materials will make your equipment last a long time.

4. Nail Remover

All the old nails need to be removed before you can lay your new roof. Look for one with teeth strong enough to pull out any stubborn nails.

Also, make sure you wear the proper shoes when you walk on a roof.

Conclusion

Removing shingles can be a long, tedious, and exhausting job, but having the right tool can make the job faster. That’s where our review of five shingle removal tools comes into play. They come with different-sized heads to handle both the most extensive roofs, and replacing just two or three shingles for a small repair. Look at the size of the job and choose the appropriate size of shingle remover for you. Here’s a quick recap of our top 5 picks:

1. Malco SB48AE The Beast Roof Shingle Removal Tool – Top Pick
2. Bully Tools 91110 10-Gauge ProShingle – Best for the Money
3. Qualcraft 54-Inch Shingle Removal Shovel
4. Dasco Pro 640 Shingle Ripper Pry Bar
5. Shingle Eater Junior

About the Author Adam Harris

Hi there! My name is Adam and I write for HealthyHandyman. I have a great passion for writing about everything related to tools, home improvement, and DIY. In my spare time, I'm either fishing, playing the guitar, or spending quality time with my beloved wife. You'll also often find me in my workshop working on some new project!