S&B Filters 3-Piece Flexible Silicon Tool Tray Review

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S&B Filters 3-Piece Flexible Silicon Tool Tray

Editor Rating: 4.7/5

Ease of Use
Convenience
Price

Review Summary

If there is one source of frustration for people who like to work with their hands, it’s interrupting the flow of a job to find the right tool or part. That frustration is much greater if you set your stuff down, go back to find the right component, and discover that it rolled away. Now, you have to interrupt the workflow to conduct a search mission.

Into this void slides the S&B Filters 3-Piece Flexible Silicon Tool Tray. It’s designed to provide a tray base that will stay put and keep your tools and components in place until you need them. The flexible base is a departure from rigid-based solutions that won’t conform to what you’re working on, and that if set at an angle, might slide down it unless you put some tape on the bottom.

A Quick Look:

Pros
  • Stays in place
  • Works well
  • Holds components
  • Easy to notice
  • Feels like a quality product
Cons
  • Flexible base could use some rigidity
  • Pricey

Specifications

Brand Name: S&B Filters

Dimensions (main tray): 13”x24”x2.75”

Dimensions (inner tray#1): 10.5”x12.5”x2.5”

Dimensions (inner tray#2): 8.5”x12.5”x2.5”

How it’s constructed

The three-piece unit is a single base with two mini-trays that fit into it like a toddler’s wooden box puzzle. The two removable inside trays are themselves divided into different sections, so you can store things like screws and nuts, nails, and socket heads. There are also bigger sections for bigger tools.

Once you pull these out, you’re left with a flexible-sided silicon mat that is good for holding bigger tools. That includes hammers, power tools, and wrenches.

How does it work?

It’s hard to overestimate how well this will work going in. You’re not affixing things in place with Super Glue. You’re placing them on a shelf so that they won’t slide or roll away. It will only ever be as effective as how high the center of gravity is on whatever you put in it, and the angle to which you have it. If you’re putting a wrench down at a 10-degree angle, the wrench isn’t going anywhere. If you put a full pitcher of water down at a 45-degree angle, chances are you’re mopping up a mess.

S&B Filters 3-Piece Flexible Silicon Tool Tray

Our field test

We field-tested how far this could go by placing tool bits in one of the smaller trays and letting it hang over the side of our porch. We tried it at a range of angles to see at what point it would hold stuff in the tray until gravity won out.

We placed some drill bits, micro screwdrivers, multi-use chucks, drill bits, and sockets in the individual sections. We chose these because they’re inexpensive enough that if one fell out and got lost, it would be no great loss.

Things started to fall out at a 45-degree angle. At an angle of approximately 30 degrees, however, items stayed pretty much in place. That’s 30 degrees, mind you, with no support underneath.

We call this a win.

About that base

One thing we went back and forth on was just how flexible the base is. On one hand, it could use a little more rigidity. On the other, it’s just a mat that you lay down to hold things in place. At the end of the day, we suspect that most people will appreciate that it’s something you can just throw down where you’re working and put things on top of that you want to stay put.

Price

The three-piece set is expensive enough that we wonder how many home hobbyists can afford it. We see a lot of utility for professionals who work in plenty of oddball positions at weird angles. Anyone who’s ever needed just that last screw, only to watch it roll over the side of an angled surface, understands the frustration involved. But someone who just wants something to keep parts organized while working under an open hood might just opt for something much more affordable.

Conclusion

The S&B Filters 3-Piece Flexible Silicon Tool Tray is a novel solution to the issue of keeping things organized while working in imperfect conditions. Eventually, gravity will always win, but you’ve got to about 30 degrees before you start to lose. We have mixed emotions about how flexible the tray is, but we wonder if the price makes it a bad value to anyone but a professional who can lay out the dough this costs.

About the Author Adam Harris

Hi there! My name is Adam and I write for HealthyHandyman. I have a great passion for writing about everything related to tools, home improvement, and DIY. In my spare time, I'm either fishing, playing the guitar, or spending quality time with my beloved wife. You'll also often find me in my workshop working on some new project!